Colonel
William Jennings Landram

(also spelled Landrum)

 

Col. William Jennings Landram
Submitted by William L. Williamson <wlwillia@facstaff.wisc.edu>

 

Appointed colonel of the 1st Kentucky Cavalry 7/5/1861 by Lt. W. Nelson, U. S. Navy, at Lancaster Kentucky
Resigned 7/1861 because he preferred service in the infantry
Raised the 19th Kentucky Volunteer Infantry
Mustered as Colonel of the 19th Kentucky 1/2/1861 at Camp Harrod, Kentucky, for 3 years
Commander of 19th Kentucky (10/29/1862-10/1862)
Commander of Second Brigade, 1st Division, Army of Kentucky (10/1862-11/1862)
Commander of Second Brigade, 10th Division (1/2/1862-3/1863)
Commander 19th Kentucky (3/1863-1/1864)
Commander of First Brigade 4th Division 13th Army Corps (2/8/1863-9/63)
Commander of First Brigade 4th Division Thirteenth Army Corps (9/1863-2/1864)
Commander of Fourth Division Thirteenth Army Corps (3/1864-8/64)
Commander Cavalry Brigade at Baton Rouge, Louisiana (8/13/1864-8/1864)
Commander District of Baton Rouge & Port Hudson, Louisiana (10/15/1864-11/1864)
Commander 19th Kentucky (11-1864-1/26/1865)
Mustered out at Louisville, Kentucky 1/26/1865
Appointed Brigadier General by Brevet "for gallant and meritorious service during the war." 6/22/1867 to date from 3/13/1865

*Data from Col. W. J. Landram's Military Record at the Aational Archives and Sergeant Eastham Tarrant, Wild Riders of the First Kentucky Cavalry, reprinted 1997 by Genesis Publishing Co., West Jefferson, Ohio. Originally published in 1894. 

 
Lexington (KY) Leader, October 17, 1895

HE IS DEAD A Hero of Two Wars Surrenders at Last Gen. W. J. Landram Passes Away at Lancaster

Beautiful Floral Tribute from Lexington Sketch of the Career of a Man Of High Character and Attainments All of his Children at the Funeral.

General W. J. Landram, a veteran of the Mexican War and the Civil War, and an honored Kentuckian, died at Lancaster late Friday Night [October 11, 1895].  Death had been hovering over his bed for days, and the end was looked for at any moment.  He was in his 68th year, he had never been a robust man, and death was the result of a general giving way of his whole system rather than any specific organic complaint.

Brigadier General William Jennings Landram, lawyer and soldier, was born February 11, 1828, at Lancaster, Ky., where he has since resided.  His parents were Louis and Martha A. Landram, and he was their eldest child.  His father was a lawyer by profession, a Virginian by birth, and came to Scott County, Ky., in the early part of this century. He subsequently located at Lancaster, Ky., where he held several offices under the Government.  He was particularly noted for his great attachment for and prominence in the Masonic fraternity.  His mother was a native of Garrard County, a niece of Chief Justice Robertson, and daughter of James George, a farmer of that county.  He died in 1873.

Gen. Landram received an education in the best private schools of the country, and in 1845 became Deputy Clerk for the Circuit and County Courts for Garrard county.  After the commencement of the Mexican war he enlisted in Company A, of Col. Humphrey Marshall's First Kentucky Cavalry.  At the end of the first month he was promoted to Orderly Sergeant.  He participated in the famous battle of Buena Vista, where he was wounded by a saber cut across the shoulder. At the close of the term of enlistment for the regiment he returned home and resumed his place in the Clerk's office and read law during his leisure hours.       

In 1850-51 he edited the Garrard Banner, a political journal in Lancaster, Ky. In 1851 he was admitted to the bar; in 1853 he was elected Clerk of the Circuit Court and was continuously the incumbent of that office until the commencement of the war of the rebellion. In 1861 he entered the Government service at Camp Dick Robinson, and was commissioned Colonel of the First Kentucky Cavalry, which position he soon resigned owing to his dislike to that branch of the service.  By order of Gen. Sherman, he took charge of the Government grounds at Harrodsburg, and in two months recruited the Nineteenth (19th) Kentucky Volunteer Infantry, and was commissioned colonel.  He participated in the battles of Chickasaw Bayou, Arkansas Port, Port Gibson, Champion Hills, Black River Bridge, siege of Vicksburg and siege of Jackson.  He commanded in these battles the second brigade fourth division thirteenth army corps, composed of the Nineteenth Kentucky, Forty-eighth Ohio, Seventy-seventh, Ninety-seventh, One Hundred and Eighth and One Hundred and Thirtieth Illinois and the Chicago Mercantile Battery [a post that called for the rank of Brigadier General].  In the battle of Sabine Cross Roads, La., he commanded the fourth division of the Thirteenth Army Corps [a post that called for the rank of Major General].  In 1865 he was promoted Brigadier General for meritorious conduct.  He commanded the Baton Rouge district for some time and had charge of the cavalry camp of instruction at New Orleans.  At the close of the war he returned to Lancaster and in 1867 was appointed Collector of Internal Revenue by Andrew Johnson, which position he held until 1885.  He then resumed the practice of law.       

He was a Whig until the dissolution of that party, and voted for Bell and Everett in 1860.  He has since been an active Republican and has twice been Chairman of the Republican State Central Committee. He was always an Emancipationist and in 1849 voted for the abolition of Negro slavery in Kentucky.

He was married in 1848 to Sarah Adeline Walker, who survives him, and who is closely related to the prominent McKee family of Kentucky.  Nine children blessed the union, of whom five are living: Mary, wife of Richard A. Burnside, of Lancaster; Addie, wife of William McFarland, U.S.A.; Ella, wife of Woodford G. Dunlap, of Lexington; Kate, wife of William McGuigan, of Indiana, and Louis, lawyer and editor, of Lancaster. Gen. Landram was a Mason, an I.O.O.F., and for thirty seven years had been an elder in the Presbyterian Church.  He had little opportunity to practice his chosen profession, most of his time being occupied in the public positions in which he had been called, and in which he made such an enviable record.  He was a brave and efficient soldier and served the nation nobly through two bloody wars.  He was distinguished for his strong, admirable traits of character, for his fearless devotion to just and honorable principles and for his unexceptional personal and social habits.  His literary talents were above the ordinary, and his pen was ever ready in composition of both prose and poetry.  He was identified with the highest progress of his community, and was an apostle of the elegant code of manners and proprieties peculiar to the post-colonial era.  As a father he was indulgent and liberal; as a host he was proverbial for his warm welcome to all who came within his gates.  He was kind and charitable to the poor. His daily life bore record of innumerable acts of courtesy and favor in the line of obituary notices, weddings, tributes of respect, invitations, letters of special import, public addresses, schoolboy essays, and the thousand of such calls liable to be made in every small community.  He was ever ready and willing with word or pen.       

As a musician he made a reputation, not only playing several instruments, but composing and writing music with facility.  In the voluminous correspondence he has left are letters from the most distinguished statesmen, soldiers and social leaders in the United States, and his scrap book would prove valuable compendiums upon almost every topic of interest to the intelligent reader.  He was gifted with versatile talent, and though as a self-made man the divinity that shaped his ends may have been in a measure rought hewn, yet there few favored sons of fortune whose record of ability and accomplishment can equal that which he has left behind. May he rest in peace.    

W. G. D.  [Woodford Gaines Dunlap, son in law, husband of Ella, father of Eugenia Dunlap Williamson, and grandfather of William Landram Williamson] {Bracketed portions by WLW}       

 

“The Union Regiments of Kentucky.”
Published under the Auspices of the Union Soldiers and Sailors Monument Association

The Regimental Histories and Shetch of Military Campains.
By Capt. Thos. Speed.
Political Conditions During the War.
By Col. R. M. Kelly.
Biographical Sketches.
By Maj. Alfred Pirtle.

p. 69.

GEN. WILLIAM JENNINGS LANDRAM was born at Lancaster, Ky., February 11, 1828; was educated at the best schools in Garrard county; entered the service of the United States first as a private in Co. A, of Col. Humphrey- Marshall’s 1st Ky. Cav., in the Mexican War, being mustered in June 9, 1846; promoted to orderly sergeant; wounded by saber cut on the shoulder at Buena Vista; mustered out June 8, 1847. In 1861 entered the service at Camp Dick Robinson and was commissioned colonel, 1st Ky. Cav. Which he soon resigned on account of his dislike to the cavalry service. Later he raised the 19th Ky. Vol. Inf., and was commissioned colonel. The history of this regiment, in another part of this volume, will give his record while in command of it; though colonel, he afterward commanded the second brigade, 4 th Division,13 th Army Corps; finally at the battle of Sabine-Crossroads, La. He commanded the 4 th Division, 13 th Army Corps. In 1865 was promoted to brigadier-general and commanded the Baton Rouge, La., district for some time. Was mustered out at the end of the war, while on duty near New Orleans. Was appointed collector of Internal revenue under President Johnson, and held it till 1885. He then entered the practice of law at Lancaster Ky., where he resided permanently. For 42 years he was an elder in the Presbyterian Church. He died Oct. 11, 1895.

 

 

The Bibliographic encyclopedia of Kentucky of the Dead and Living Men of the ninteenth century
Cincinnati , Ohio
j. m. Armstrong & company 1878.

Landram, Brigadier-General William Jennings , lawyer and Soldier, was born February 11, 1828, at Lancaster, Kentucky, where he has since resided. His parents were Louis and Martha A. Landram, and he was their oldest child. His father was a lawyer by profession, a Virginian by birth; came to Scott County early in the Century; located at Lancaster, where he died, in 1873. He held various offices under the Government, and was particularly noted for his great achievement for, and prominence in, the Masonic Fraternity. His mother was a native of Gerard County, a niece of Chief-Justice Robertson, and daughter of James George, a farmer of that county. Gen. Landram received an education in the best private schools of the county, and in 1845, became Clerk of the Circuit and County Courts for Gerard County. After the commencement of the Mexican War, he enlisted as a private in Company A of Col. Humphrey Marshall’s First Kentucky Cavalry; at the end of the first month was promoted to orderly sergeant; participated in the famous battle of Buena Vista, where he was wounded by a saber-cut across the shoulder; and, at the expiration of the term of enlistment; for the engagement, returned home, and resumed his place in the clerk’s office, during his leasure hours reading law. In 1850 and 1851, he edited and published the Gerard Banner”, a political Journal, in Lancaster, Kentucky; in 1854, he was admitted to the bar; in 1853, he was elected Clerk of the Circuit Court for Gerard County; was continually re-elected, and held the office until the commencement of the War of the Rebellion; in 1861 he entered the Government service at Camp Dick Robinson, and was commissioned Colonel of the First Kentucky Cavalry, which position he resigned in a few days, on account of his dislike to the cavalry service. By order of General Sherman, he took charge of the Government grounds at Harridsburg, and in two months, recruited the Ninteenth Kentucky Volunteer Infantry, and was commissioned its colonel. He participated in the battles of Chickasaw Bayou, Arkansas Post, Port Gibson. Champion Hills, Black River Bridge, siege of Vicksburg, , and siege of Jackson; commanded, in these three battles, the second Brigade, Fourth Division, Thirteenth Army Corps, composed of the Nineteenth Kentucky, Forty-eighth Ohio, Ninety-seventh, One Hundred and eighth, and One Hundred and Thirteenth Illinois Regiments, and the Chicago Mercantile Battery; in the Battle of Sabine Crossroads, Louisiana, he commanded the Fourth Division, Thirteenth army Corps; in 1865, was promoted to Brigadier General of Volunteers; commanded at baton Rouge District for some time; had charge of the Cavalry Camp of Instruction, at New Orleans; and, when the end finally came, returned to his home at Lancaster. In 1867 he was appointed, by Andrew Johnson, Collector of Internal Revenue for the Eighth Kentucky District; and has held the position since, by reappointment from President Grant, He was a Whig until the desolation of that party, and voted for Bell and Everett, in 1860. He has since been a Republican; is Chairman of the State Central committee of that party, and was noted for his warm support of General Grant’s administration. He has always been an emancipationist, and, in 1849, voted for abolition of negro slavery in Kentucky. He has had little opportunity for the practice of his chosen profession, most of his time being occupied in the public positions to which he has been called, and in which he has made an enviable record. He was a brave and efficient soldier, and served the nation nobly throughout a long and bloody war; is distinguished for his strong, admirable traits of character; for his fearless devotion to just and honorable principles; and for his unexceptional personal habits. For over twenty years he has been an elder in the Presbyterian Church. General Landram was married, in 1849, to Miss Sarah A. Walker, Daughter of William Walker, a merchant and old settler of Gerard County.

 

 

Recommendation for Promotion to Gen. Banks

Landram's POW Exchange Muster

W. J. Landram's Brevet Order

Landram outlines his military career
as part of his pension application


 

 

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